It’s Rhythmic

Part Five
(This is the final in a series of five posts describing my aesthetic or artistic sensibility in more detail.)

My aesthetic is Rhythmic

In my previous post I explained a bit about how I build movement into my painting’s composition. One of the main ways I accomplish this is through various rhythms that I set up in a picture.

When we think of rhythm we think of music. Our ears love rhythm and latch on to interesting rhythms in songs and symphonies but also in raindrops on windshields, heels on hardwood, faulty faucets, and wherever else it can be heard or imagined. Our eyes love rhythm too. They are drawn to repetition and pattern all around us. They find rhythm in the thrum of trees along a highway or the measured beat of a balustrade.

I’d like to highlight three examples of how I bring rhythm into my paintings. These three are also signature elements that make my work instantly identifiable as uniquely mine.

  • The use of cross hatching in patterned fields as a simple signifier for all fabric.
  • The stylized representation of hands and feet and the repetition of toes in line.
  • The use of running script along the sides of the canvas panel that acts as a framing device for the image.

I have illustrated each of these basic uses of rhythm below. Used together with repeating lines, dashes of pure color, stippled brushwork and many other devices, these three examples of rhythm in my work enliven a painting and delight the eye.

Signature cross hatching pattern in the painting Francisco.

Signature cross hatching creates a rhythmic pattern in the painting Francisco.

Repeating imagery in the painting Adan y Evas.

Repeating imagery sets up a rhythm in the painting Adan y Evas.

Words framing the painting Onotemeras. Script is often from other languages, are used with no punctuation or spaces between words. The text relates to the imagery and adds another  layer of meaning. It is not meant to be read as a sign or deciphered in order to understand the meaning of a work.

Words framing the painting Onotemeras. This script is often from other languages and is used with no punctuation or spaces between words. The text relates to the imagery and adds another layer of meaning. It is not meant to be read as a sign however or “deciphered” in order to understand the meaning of a work.

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